#TurningAngel Review

Introduction

Writing is a skill that I cherish greatly. The ability to write well is a skill that has been difficult to master. However, with the help of teachers, who have settled for nothing less than improvement, I am deeply grateful. Digressing from the topic at-hand, I will begin with my rendition of a book review.

Turning Angel Review

Greg Iles, is an author, whose novel’s I have recently come to enjoy. By the recommendation of friends, I have started reading books from The Penn Cage series. The first book in this series, is “The Quiet Game.” In my opinion, this is an excellent introduction into the mystery and suspense genre of Iles. Furthermore, this second novel, Turning Angel, is an excellent glimpse into the life of Cage.

Iles does not waste time in drawing the reader into the crises that has befallen Natchez, Mississippi. Participating in a St. Stephen’s high school board meeting, Cage, and best friend, Drew Elliott, hear the disheartening news about Kate Townsend. Found floating near the Mississippi River, Townsend’s death floods the riverbanks, shrouding the small southern community in fear and speculation because of the recent murder. Confiding in his best friend, Drew Elliott begins to tell Cage of his affair with the murdered teenager. Quickly spiraling into a twisted plot of dissection and murder, Iles, has taken readers into a world full of controversy, misunderstanding, and into an unfortunate reality that Currently plagues society. Revered as a great Physician who has genuine care for his patients’, Dr. Elliott, is Quickly shunned by those who disapprove of his behavior. Seeming to flow beneath the surface of the great Mississippi River, lies an undercurrent of crime that equally perplexes the citizens of Natchez. In an effort to vindicate Elliott, Cage seeks the counsel of former civil rights lawyer, Quentin Avery, and Cage’s babysitter – who work Together to solve this tale of betrayal, temptation, and love.

Personal Thoughts

This story is one that has captivated me from the opening pages. Similar to the first novel, Iles, does not spare readers the experiences of suspense and heart-pounding fiction that parallel life as it is known presently. Empathizing with Dr. Elliott, I can understand his reasons for falling in-love with a younger lady. I too, have succumb to the feelings of love for a member of the opposite sex that is younger than myself. However, where my disapproval lies, is with Elliott’s transgression against his marriage.

In this second decade of the 21st-century, it is not at all surprising to hear news reports of students and teachers becoming intimately involved with one another to the point of monogamy. In the case of this novel, the relationship between Elliott and Townsend is not excused. However, an appreciation is felt for the love between both people because at the foundation of humanity, everyone is searching for acceptance, affection, and affirmation. It is understandable to observe why Elliott becomes profoundly drawn to this younger woman, who equally reciprocates her affection for him. However, because of the deviant nature this lifestyle imposes on society, it is equally understandable why both characters kept their affair secret. Thus, because of my affinity for dating women younger than myself, because of the degree of maturity some of these young women have (albeit rare), and because of the desire to learn from a more experienced person, who can nurture growth in a positive way, is perhaps why in the instance of this novel, the notion of love between people with a considerable age difference is more easily tolerated.

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